Fear, Incompetence and Calamity

You think that it cannot get worse. There must come a moment when the government will reclaim some self-respect while the Prime Minister recovers some power of leadership. After all, she is the PM. But you are wrong. There seems to be no limit to drift and indecisiveness. No-one understands what is happening; no-one knows how to put it right. Mrs May has forfeited all authority and any claim to loyalty, or even affection. She is now derided, despised and disregarded.

read more

Grief, Guns and Hard Thinking

Seventeen murders, which means that around twice that number of people are facing a life sentence. There is no remission for grief and loss. Everyone is trying to work out why, and what can be done. In all that fog of confusion, there is only one certainty. This will not end with Florida. There will be more casual slaughters, more parents hoping against hope that their child has not fallen victim, only for that hope to end in heart-rending news and a life hurled into misery.

read more

An Irishism and a Terrible Sonnet

'May comes good at last' the newspapers proclaimed. This led to a rush to the life-support machine. Were the instruments suggesting that the brain was still alive? 'No' came the swift answer: 'wrong May'. Jonny May, the rugger player, had scored a brace of tries and helped England to victory. Theresa May, the politics player, still showed no signs of trying. The idea that she could help anyone to victory at anything is risible.

read more

The Ninny, the Clown and the Bennite

There is only one conclusion to be drawn from recent events. No government which includes Boris Johnson is worthy of the name. It would be tempting to conclude that the Foreign Secretary is just a spoiled, attention-seeking child. But that would be a serious underestimation. Boris knows that Mrs May thinks nothing of him and would dismiss him if she felt it safe to do so. So he is determined to remind her of the consequences of parting company.

read more

The Luck of the French

In politics, luck is crucial. In 1794 at the end of the Terror, when fear and paranioa were rampant, Napoleon was fortunate not to be guillotined. After the failure of the Egyptian expedition, he set off back to France in a single warship. Nelson was patrolling Mediterranean waters with a superior force. If Napoleon had run into him, history would have been very different. But the future Emperor's luck did not fail him, until he invaded Russia.

read more